Email Marketing Tools: Gmail Categories Adoption and Accuracy—One in 10 Gmail Users Say Messages Are Miscategorized

Pr, Marketing, Public relations, Return Path, marketing messages, marketing email, email solutions, Gmail for marketers, Gmail automatic sorting, email classification, can be bad news for marketers, Gmail Promotions tabGmail remains the world’s most popular free webmail service, and new research from email solutions provider Return Path shows that marketers should be vigilant about how their messages are handled by Gmail’s automatic sorting feature. The recently published Email Marketer’s Guide to Gmail Categories report reveals that nearly 10 percent of tabbed inbox users say that messages are not sorted correctly.

Incorrect classification can be bad news for marketers, as Gmail users become conditioned to look for certain types of messages in a specific tab. For example, Return Path research shows that nearly half (45 percent) of tabbed inbox users check the Promotions tab—used to aggregate marketing promotions and other offers—at least once each day. Marketing email delivered to a less frequently monitored tab could be missed altogether.

“Reaching the inbox is critical in today’s competitive marketplace. And in the case of Gmail, it’s just as important that messages are delivered to the expected category,” said Cody Bender, Return Path senior director of email optimization solutions, in a news release. “Gmail has created the industry’s most sophisticated email sorting system, so it’s vital that marketers pay attention to how their messages are being classified.”

The report also explores inbox placement rate and read rate for emails in each category, as well as industry breakdowns indicating that certain industries may be especially susceptible to having their messages miscategorized.

The Return Path product team analyzed this issue, and recently introduced a new Gmail Categories feature in its Inbox Monitor product. Using data from Return Path’s Consumer Network of nearly 2 million active inboxes, the Gmail Categories widget allows customers to see how email campaigns are categorized for their actual Gmail subscribers.

Download the full report here.

Return Path created this report based on results from a Google Consumer Survey and data from its Inbox Monitor tool. The Google Consumer Survey was conducted on December 15, 2016, and surveyed 1,628 Gmail users. Gmail classification analysis is based on more than 6 billion messages sent to Gmail users from October 20-27, 2016.

Source: Business Wire; edited by Richard Carufel

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