Use the judges’ scoring criteria to hone your entry for outstanding not-for-profit communications
The Bulldog Non-Profit PR Awards reward public relations, public affairs, public information and corporate communications mastery—your ability to achieve extraordinary visibility and engagement and influence opinion about your organization. These awards reward strategic prowess, creativity, astute messaging and command of traditional and social media. Large-budget campaigns and global organizations are welcome, but  small-budget and regional organizations enjoy equal standing.
FOR CAMPAIGN ENTRIES
For campaign entries, please detail your strategy—especially as it relates to organizational objectives, social need and problem-solving—as well as implementation, and a summary of results, plus a sample of your best publicity example only. The judges want to see extraordinary traditional and digital media savvy, creativity and resourcefulness. For campaign entries, please also include the campaign’s budget (which may remain confidential) so the judges can assess relative achievement.
Specifically, here are the qualities that will win you a Bulldog Non-Profit PR Award for a campaign, especially when evident in combination:
Campaign Creativity and Originality. How clever is the story angle—how original is the media hook and how appealing on a human level is the communications idea? To what degree was creativity employed in the face of adversity—how well did this effort overcome a small budget, obscurity, disaster or indistinguishability of the non-profit brand, activity or services in general? (Possible points: 10)
Campaign Strategic and Tactical Brilliance. How shrewd was the strategic design of the campaign and how astutely were traditional and social media targeted?  How clearly and powerfully were the messages and communications vehicles tied to the program’s underlying objective and to the targeted media? How effectively were targeted audiences engaged? How well is the effort customized to reflect the particular interests of the audiences, journalists and media targeted? (Possible points: 8)
Team’s Fast Thinking/Quick Turnaround. How well did this entrant respond to current events or trends, breaking news, a crisis, or the need of the media for rapid reaction? (Possible points: 5)
Campaign Results, Results, Results. How many top media within the campaign’s target market picked up the program’s story—particularly media with tough requirements and/or little space for PR-driven stories?  How much social media visibility did this campaign achieve?  How positive and broad was the coverage? How effectively were audiences engaged, how did they respond?  Relative to the effort’s budget, how much impact did this campaign make?  (Possible points: 12)
FOR AGENCY ENTRIES
Guidelines for Agency-Category Entries: In general, agencies will be judged on a combination of four values exhibited over time, and particularly in the last year: 1) Demonstrated commitment to non-profit communications; 2) outstanding achievements in implementing such campaigns; and 3) creative, groundbreaking contributions to the field of non-profit communications. These qualities should be described and backed with hard data whenever possible.
For all Agency entries, please include a statement of annual revenue (for agencies, fees plus mark-up for outside purchases) that matches the organizational category or categories entered.
Firm Postioning—Unique Sales Proposition and Mission. How importantly does non-profit communications fit into the firm’s overall positioning—on the firm’s website and in its client list, mission statement and marketing materials, such as blogs and brochures?  How clear and distinguishable is its stated uniqueness?  We’re looking for a firm that distinguishes itself meaningfully and originally. (Possible points: 5)
Relevant Activity and Account Retention. How long and how consistently has the firm worked with non-profit clients, especially in recent years?  How significant are not-for-profit pro bono clients in the firm’s client mix? How have client numbers and/or activity levels in this practice area grown in recent years?  (Possible points: 7) 
Industry Recognition. How has the firm been recognized in its clients’ service areas and in the PR/communications business for accomplishments in communicating non-profit good works?  We’re looking for firms that have produced outstanding work over time, but most importantly are recognized for doing so currently. (Possible points: 7) 
Demonstrated Expertise of Staff. What unique or remarkable expertise does the firm bring to the challenges of not-for-profit communications?  What unusual skills have its staff developed and what leadership have staff membership shown in furthering this field of communications? We’re looking for a strong, consistent “bench” in this practice area. (Possible points: 6) 
Improve Society. What worthy causes has the firm involved itself in—which values are demonstrably important to the firm?  How has the firm had a positive impact on the world we live in and, by extension, on the credibility of the communications profession, especially in the past year?  We want to see examples of the firm encouraging client integrity, honesty and authenticity, as well as pro bono work for clients that benefits society. (Possible points: 6) 
Results Achieved for Clients. What extraordinary results related to non-profit PR and marketing has the agency contributed over the past year (and years) to its clients?  What innovations has the firm contributed to the practice of non-profit communications?  How well has the firm demonstrated that PR and communications can add high value and be extremely cost-effective in this practice area? (Possible points: 9) 
FOR ORGANIZATION ENTRIES 
Guidelines for Organization-Category Entries: In general, agencies will be judged on a combination of four values exhibited over time, and particularly in the last year: 1) Demonstrated commitment to non-profit communications; 2) outstanding achievements in implementing such campaigns; and 3) creative, groundbreaking contributions to the field of non-profit communications. These qualities should be described and backed with hard data whenever possible.
For all Organization entries, please include a statement of annual revenue  that matches the organizational category or categories entered.
Stature of the Organization’s Communications Function—Importance of Communications and Involvement of Top Management. How importantly does the communications function serve and fit into the non-profit organization’s overall positioning—on the firm’s website, its mission statement and in marketing materials, such as blogs and brochures?  How involved in and supportive of communications is top management?    We’re looking for an organization whose communications are integral to its functioning, fundraising and distinguishing itself meaningfully and originally. (Possible points: 7) 
Originality, Impact and Strategic Brilliance of the Organization’s Communications. How singular, creative and distinguishable are the organization’s communications—in both traditional and social media—especially in the past year?  How well has the organization responded to breaking news and events in its communications?  How effectively are the organization’s communications strategized relative to the organization’s mission and service objectives?  (Possible points: 7) 
Industry Recognition. How has the organization been recognized in its specific service areas and in the not-for-profit world for accomplishments in communicating its brand, activities and services?  We’re looking for organizations that have produced outstanding work over time, but most importantly are recognized for doing so currently. (Possible points: 5) 
Demonstrated Expertise of Staff. What unique or remarkable expertise does the organization bring to the challenges of non-profit PR and communications?  What unusual skills have its staff developed and what leadership have staff membership shown in furthering this field of communications? We’re looking for a strong, consistent “bench” in this practice area. (Possible points: 6) 
Innovation In Not-For-Profit Communications. How has this organization advanced the practice of non-profit communications through its creativity, dedication and innovations?  For how long has this organization demonstrated leadership in in PR/communications for not-for-profit organizations in general, and what accomplishments has the organization’s communications made that advance the field? (Possible points: 6) 
Extraordinary Pr/Communications Results Achieved. What outstanding results related to the organization’s brand, activities and services has its communications achieved over the past year (and years)?  How well were communications results tied to the organization’s mission and specific annual objectives?  How well has the communications department demonstrated that PR and communications can add high value and be extremely cost-effective to the organization?(Possible points: 9) 
OUTSTANDING NON-PROFIT COMMUNICATOR SCORING 
Guidelines for People-Category Entries: Candidates may be nominated by colleagues or organizations or may enter themselves. Judges will look for commitment, leadership, creativity and extraordinary achievement—displays of breakthrough thinking, initiative, advancement, results and qualities that reflect positively on the non-profit communications. These qualities and accomplishments may be from the past year or cumulative over a career.
Professional Leadership. How has this person demonstrated leadership in non-profit communications among co-workers and among industry colleagues?  How has he or she set high standards of performance for others, particularly in the areas of innovation, consistency, leadership, dedication and determination?  We’re looking for someone who inspires others to higher achievement in this field. (Possible points: 6) 
Demonstration Of Integrity. How has this person demonstrated integrity—a commitment to honesty, authenticity and transparency—in her or his own practice and in leading organizations to higher goals, visions and good works?  We’re looking for people who by their values elevate the practice of corporate social responsibility and sustainability communications. (Possible points: 6) 
Breakthrough Communications Approaches. What innovations and advances—new strategic and/or tactical approaches—has this person contributed to the practice of non-profit communications, especially over the past year?  We’re looking for someone who, by introducing new methods, moves this field forward.(Possible points: 7) 
Contributions to the Profession. How has this person advanced the image of corporate social responsibility and sustainability communications through their creativity, dedication and innovations?  How involved has this person been in PR/communications for non-profit organizations over time, and what accomplishments has she or he made that advance the field? (Possible points: 6) 
Improve Society. Which worthy causes has this person involved her- or himself in—which values are demonstrably important to him or her?  How has she or he had a positive impact on the world we live in and, by extension, on the credibility of the PR/communications profession, especially in the past year?  We want to see examples of this person encouraging organizational integrity, honesty and authenticity, as well as pro bono work that benefits society. (Possible points: 6) 

Results Achieved for Clients/Employer. What extraordinary results supporting non-profit organizations has this person helped produce over the past year (and years)?  What innovations has he or she contributed to the practice of non-profit communications?  How well has this person demonstrated that PR and communications can add high value and be extremely cost-effective in this practice area?  (Possible points: 9)